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转载:Fukushima – Deep Trouble (by ROBERT HUNZIKER)

The Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant disaster may go down as one of history’s boundless tragedies and not just because of a nuclear meltdown, but rather the tragic loss of a nation’s soul.
Imagine the following scenario: 207 million cardboard book boxes, end-to-end, circumnavigating Earth, like railroad tracks, going all the way around the planet. That’s a lot of book boxes. Now, fill the boxes with radioactive waste. Forthwith, that’s the amount of radioactive waste stored unsheltered in one-tonne black bags throughout Fukushima Prefecture, amounting to 9,000,000 cubic metres
But wait, there’s more to come, another 13,000,000 cubic metres of radioactive soil is yet to be collected. (Source: Voice of America News, Problems Keep Piling Up in Fukushima, Feb. 17, 2016).
And, there’s still more, the cleanup operations only go 50-100 feet beyond roadways. Plus, a 100-mile mountain range along the coast and hillsides around Fukushima are contaminated but not cleansed at all. As a consequence, the decontaminated land will likely be re-contaminated by radioactive runoff from the hills and mountains.
Indubitably, how and where to store millions of cubic metres of one-tonne black bags filled with radioactive waste is no small problem. It is a super-colossal problem. What if bags deteriorate? What if a tsunami hits? The “what-ifs” are endless, endless, and beyond.
“The black bags of radioactive soil, now scattered at 115,000 locations in Fukushima, are eventually to be moved to yet-to-be built interim facilities, encompassing 16 square kilometers, in two towns close to the crippled nuclear power plant,” Ibid.
By itself, 115,000 locations each containing many, many, mucho one-tonne bags of radioactive waste is a logistical nightmare, just the trucking alone is forever a humongous task, decades to come.
According to Japanese government and industry sources, cleaning up everything and decommissioning the broken down reactors will take at least 40 years at a cost of $250 billion, assuming nothing goes wrong. But dismally, everything that can possibly go wrong for Tokyo Electric Power Company (“TEPCO”) over the past 5 years has gone wrong, not a good record.
And, Japan is hosting the 2020 Olympics?
Yet, Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant remains totally out of control with no end in sight. As far as that goes, Olympic events alongside an out of control nuclear meltdown seem unfathomable.
As recently as October 30, 2015, The Japan Times reported: “Extremely high radiation levels and the inability to grasp the details about melted nuclear fuel make it impossible for the utility to chart the course of its planned decommissioning of the reactors at the plant.”
On the other hand, according to TEPCO, preparation is underway for removal of the melted nuclear fuel, scheduled to begin in 2021. “But it is difficult to know what is happening inside the reactors, and there are no established methods for doing so… It is not difficult to get a camera inside the reactor. The problem is the camera breaks down due to high levels of radiation,” according to Toru Ogawa, director of the Japan Atomic Energy Agency’s Collaborative Laboratories for Advanced Decommissioning Science (Kiyoshi Ando, senior staff writer, Long Road Ahead for Fukushima Cleanup, Nikkei Asian Review, Feb. 19, 2016).
Beyond the remote possibility they find the melted nuclear core aka: corium, engineers have not yet figured out how to cart the molten core away, assuming it can ever be located, and somehow handled. Meantime, if molten core burrows through the steel-reinforced concrete containment vessels into Earth, then what? It is likely a disaster for the ages! But, what about the Olympics?
If perchance melted nuclear core penetrates its steel-reinforced concrete containment vessel and burrows into the ground, it likely results in deadly isotopes uncontrollably spreading erratically, ubiquitously into surrounding underground soil and water. It is difficult to imagine Olympic events where melted nuclear core is still at large.
“Sporting events at the 2020 Tokyo Olympics are to be held in the Japanese region of Fukushima… Spectators and athletes in the Olympic village will be served with food from the region as part of an effort to restore the reputation of Fukushima, formerly one of Japan’s richest agricultural regions,” Fukushima to Host Olympic 2020 Events, The Times, Feb. 25, 2015.
The Tragedy of Countless Unreported Worker Deaths
Indeed, the question of whether Fukushima can ever be adequately, safely decontaminated is wide-open, which logically segues to question who does the dirty work, how workers are hired, and what’s their health status? According to mainstream news sources in Japan, workers are doing just fine, estimates range up to 45,000 workers all-in, no major problems.
As far as the world is concerned, the following headline sums up radiation-related issues for workers, First Fukushima Worker Diagnosed With Radiation-linked Cancer, The Telegraph, Oct. 20, 2015. All things considered, that’s not so bad. But, who’s counting?
Trustworthy sources outside of mainstream news claim otherwise, none more so than Mako Oshidori, a Japanese freelance journalist and a director of Free Press Corporation/Japan, and a former student of School of Life Sciences at Tottori University Faculty of Medicine, in a lecture entitled “The Hidden Truth about Fukushima” delivered at the international conference “Effects of Nuclear Disasters on Natural Environment and Human Health” held in Germany in 2014 co-organized by International Physicians for Prevention of Nuclear War.
Free Press Corporation/Japan was formed after the 2011 Great Sendai Earthquake as a counterbalance to Japan’s mainstream government influenced media, described by Mako as journalists who do not report truth, journalists afraid of the truth!
“There is one thing that really surprised me here in Europe. It’s the fact that people here think Japan is a very democratic and free country.” (Mako Oshidori)
According to Mako, TEPCO and the government deliberately cover-up deaths of Fukushima workers, and not only do they cover-up deaths, but once she investigated stories of unreported deaths, government agents started following her: “When I would talk to someone, a surveillance agent from the central government’s public police force would come very close, trying to eavesdrop on the conversation,” Exposed: Death of Fukushima Workers Covered-Up by TEPCO and Government, NSNBC International, March 21, 2014.
Mako Oshidori: “I would like to talk about my interview of a nurse who used to work at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) after the accident… He quit his job with TEPCO in 2013, and that’s when I interviewed him… As of now, there are multiple NPP workers that have died, but only the ones who died on the job are reported publicly. Some of them have died suddenly while off work, for instance, during the weekend or in their sleep, but none of their deaths are reported.”
“Not only that, they are not included in the worker death count. For example, there are some workers who quit the job after a lot of radiation exposure, such as 50, 60 to 70 mili Sieverts, and end up dying a month later, but none of these deaths are either reported, or included in the death toll. This is the reality of the NPP workers.”
The “reality of the NPP workers… dying a month later” does not correspond very well with Abe administration insistence that nuke plants reopen, even though the country has continued to function for five years without nuclear power, hmm.
In her speech, Mako talks about problems for journalists because of government interference: “An ex-agent who is knowledgeable about the work of the Public Security Intelligence Agency (“PSIA”) said that when you are visibly followed, that was meant to intimidate you. If there was one person visible, then there would be ten more. I think that is analogous to cockroaches. So, when you do a little serious investigation about the nuclear accident, you are under various pressure and it makes it more difficult to interview people.”
Still, she interviewed Fukushima mothers, e.g., “Next, I would like to talk about mothers in Fukushima. These mothers (and fathers) live in Iwaki City, Fukushima. They are active on school lunch issues. Currently, Fukushima produce isn’t selling well due to suspected contamination. So the prefectural policy is to encourage the use of Fukushima produce in school lunches, in an attempt to appeal to its safety… the mothers claim that currently in Japan only cesium is measured and they have no idea if there is any strontium-90. They oppose the use of Fukushima produce in school lunches for fear of finding out, ten-plus years down the road, that there was actually plutonium in the food that children ate.”
Mothers who oppose the prefecture’s luncheon policy are told to leave Fukushima Prefecture, move out if they worry about contamination, pull up stakes and move on.
Mako’s full interview is found here.
All of which begs the question of who does the dirty work? According to Michel Chossudovsky, director of Centre for Research on Globalization (Canada), Japan’s organized crime syndicate Yakusa is actively involved in recruitment. Personnel who qualify for radioactive cleanup work include underemployed, impoverished, indigent, unemployed, homeless, hard up, down-and-out, and poverty-stricken individuals, as well as non-destitute people willing to undertake under-paid, high-risk work. The nameless are shoe-ins.
As intimated by Mako Oshidori, governmental secrecy laws and intimidation techniques vastly overshadow the tragedy of the disaster, an oppressive black cloud that won’t go away. People are scared to say anything for fear of reprisal, jail, and blacklisting. Mako Oshidori’s name is prominently secretly blacklisted. A government mole told her.
Accordingly, it is instructive to look at Japan’s new state secrecy law Act on the Protection of Specially Designated Secrets (SDS) Act No. 108 of 2013 passed on the heels of the Fukushima meltdown, very similar to Japan’s harsh Public Peace and Order Controls of WWII. According to Act No. 108, the “act of leaking itself” is bad enough for prosecution, regardless of what, how, or why.
Thereupon, Susumu Murakoshi, president of the Japan Federation of Bar Associations says: “The law should be abolished because it jeopardizes democracy and the people’s right to know,” Abe’s Secrets Law Undermines Japan’s Democracy, The Japan Times, Dec. 13, 2014.
Public opinion is shaped by public knowledge of events, but the Abe government’s enactment of an extraordinarily broad dastardly secrecy law (almost anyone can be arrested) that threatens prison sentences up to 10 years undermines confidence in believability of the Japanese government.
But categorically, Japan needs to nurture confidence.

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市外果园

在霹雳州的近打县、碌柚故乡打扪(Tambun)的隔邻,有个小镇叫做红毛丹(Tanjung Rambutan)。红毛丹不是因为水果而著名,只是因为那里有一座104年历史的红毛丹精神病院(Ulu Kinta Mental Hospital),后来改称红毛丹幸福医院。
许多年以前,老童鞋在红毛丹购下一块山坡上的土地,经过了几千个挥汗如雨的日子,从最初的一片荒芜之地,如今被打造成一个环境优美、足以令人身处其中而流连忘返的美丽果园。





 踏入园里,迎面走来一只脸带笑容的狗狗。

“哈囖!欢迎光临,我叫Handsome boy,我是这里的总管。”




除了Handsome Boy,还有一头把尾羽展开呈扇形的雄火鸡,寸步不离的在访客身边踱过来又踱过去,偶而还用他的尖嘴往客人的小腿敲啄一下,好像一名威严又高傲的警卫长,努力在执行着自己的任务。




只见不远处,有只胖嘟嘟的雄性胡须鸡,竞然喜欢和颜色一点都不鲜艳的雌火鸡走在一齐。雌火鸡最近每天都下蛋,好给她的主人进补。“




“ 不要拍不要拍!对着镜头我们是会很害羞的啦!”




“轧轧轧轧轧轧,有陌生人来了,放我们出来,我们要出来!轧轧轧轧轧轧------------”




这是园里的两位美少女警卫,每天跟随着Handsome boy跑上跑下, 仍在实习当中。



“嗡嗡嗡,嗡嗡嗡,我们是一群小小小蜜蜂;来匆匆,去匆匆,大家勤力去做工。”





“Handsome boy,这是什么花呀?”

“杨桃花都没见过么?哎哟,原来这些城市人是那么山芭的,真是无眼睇咯!”







“不要放辣椒”

印象中,四川菜的特征,除了辣、麻、油大,许多还是冷冰冰油腻腻的凉菜。四川人连炒包菜都要撒一把花椒下去,还记得当年那股恐怖的花椒味,让俺在将要离开成都的那顿午饭中,仅以白粥裹腹!

今次的东川行,发现南面一带的云南少数民族真是超爱吃辣,几乎每样菜都是以辣为主。在旅店的餐厅里吃饭,只见一锅红红油油的辣椒汤里面泡着咱们心目中最美味的kampung鸡,捞块肉上来,摔掉红油,放入口里,就是辣得不行,对俺来说,真是暴殄天物咯!

接下来一锅云南美食酸辣鱼汤被捧上桌,只见鱼也是躺在油亮的红水中,还有荀片炒猪肉、豆腐、青菜等等,没一样是不放辣椒的。本来是很好吃的一碟菠菜,岂知又加进了辣椒,这里的不知啥辣椒,比咱们 kampung 的小辣椒可辣上好几倍,辣得喉干舌烫,咳得眼泪鼻涕直喷。学乖了, 接下来的每一餐都得额外交待,“不要放辣椒”,如此方能吃上几顿好饭。




说起来,能让咱们吃饭吃得最开心、最心满意足的,莫过於在途中的农家小饭馆里用餐,因为在这里,咱们可以和掌厨的商量煮那一些不必放辣椒的餸菜。

“大姐,这个土鸡如果要煮汤你们通常怎么做?”

(放养的土鸡肉比较结实,俺认为用来煮汤是最恰当的,有鲜甜的肉吃,还可以喝到美味的鸡汤。)

“加几片当归,放几粒红枣煮鸡汤如何?”

“可以可以!”

(窗外,只见妹妹蹲着在拔鸡毛了!)



“排骨你们怎么做?”

“白萝卜煮排骨汤怎样?”

 “可以可以!”

他们的白萝卜就种在屋后的空地上,硬梆梆的排骨,也唯有煮汤才能吃啊!用汽压锅压一压,很快的,红枣当归鸡汤,白萝卜排骨汤上桌了。当然还有青葱炒蛋、大豆芽煮肉碎、豆味香浓的豆腐、没有放辣椒白白清甜的鱼汤和鱼等等。新鲜的食材,简单的烹煮,都是原汁原味,配以本土优质的米所煮出来的饭,咱们可以把两锅汤和肉,以及其他菜肴,全部吃个盘底朝天,滴汤不剩。

在这些地方,可别奢望店家能把排骨来个或焖或炸或炖,他们连蒸水蛋是啥东东也不知道,而是鸡蛋只能配后院的青葱来炒。这里的农民依然保存着一贯的单纯和简朴,有次俺教一个厨娘倒点酱油加点水到锅里煮热,淋在那些看来已经摆了好些时候的卤鸡上面,讲了好几遍,那个大姐对着我一直笑却不断摇头,就是不明白也搞不懂俺的意思,最后我也唯有投降放弃,乖乖回桌去啃那碟放凉了的卤鸡。




昆明市近郊有个水资源丰富的农业大县,叫做「宜良」,地理环境和自然气候非常优异,有“滇中粮仓”、“鱼米之乡”、“花乡水城…

神农架和神农氏

在湖北省西部边陲,有片总面积约3千多平方公里的生态区域,地名好特别,叫做「神农架」,好像有点神秘感,让人有很想去那边一探究竟的欲望。据说神农架人文历史久远,早在20多万年前,就有古人类在此活动。



为何这块森林地域会叫做「神农架」呢?原来是和焱帝神农氏有关系的。
传说中:远古时代,五谷和杂草、药物与百花全混在一块成长,当时的人都搞不懂那些可以吃、那些是可以用来治病的。为了能帮老百姓治病和填饱他们的肚子,这个人身牛首、除四肢和脑袋外身体透明的部落首领,带着臣民往西北大山走去。走了七七四十九天,来到一座高山上,但见此处山势陡峭,森林遍野,山上长满了奇花异草,老远就可以闻到花草的香气。



神农率众打算继续往前走,突然从峡谷窜出一群狼蛇虎豹,把他们团团围住。神农让臣民挥舞神鞭,把一批又一批的野兽赶走,打了七天七夜,方把野兽全部赶跑。进了峡谷,来到一座山脚下,山的上半截插在云彩里,四面是刀切崖,长满青苔、溜光水滑的崖上挂着瀑布。这时,有几只金丝猴,顺着高悬的古藤和横倒在崖边的朽木攀爬跳跃,神农灵机一动,教臣民砍木杆,割藤条,靠着山崖搭成架子,实行“架木为梯,以助攀缘”。从春到夏,从秋到冬,不管刮风下雨还是飞雪结冰,一天搭上一层木架,从不停工,搭了一整年,共搭了三百六十层方到达山顶。



山上密密丛丛、遍地是红、绿、白、黄各色各样的花草世界。神农亲尝百草,由於他的身体是透明的,如果内臟呈现黑色,就知道那种草药是有毒,什么草药对於人体那一个部位有影响。为了替老百姓找医药,找可以裹腹的粮草,神农教臣民们在山上栽种冷杉,当做城墙防野兽,“ 架木为屋,以避风雨”,盖茅屋居住下来。
神农於白天领着臣民到山上尝百草,晚上就着篝火的火光,把各种草药的性质,是苦、是热、是凉,那些可以治病,那些可以充饥,清清楚楚详细记载下来。



有一次,神农把一棵草放在嘴里一尝,立时晕眩摔倒,不能言语。臣民们慌忙扶他坐起,神农用仅有的一点力气,指着前面一棵红亮亮的灵芝草,又指指自己的嘴巴,旁人赶紧把灵芝草嚼烂,喂到神农嘴里。灵芝草把毒气解除,神农的头再也不昏了,说话的能力也恢复了,从此,人们就认识到灵芝草可以起死回生的功效。臣民担心神农这样尝草确实太危险,都劝他不如下山回去。神农摇头说:“ 不能回去!黎民百姓饿了没吃的,病了没医的,我们怎么能回去呢?” 说罢,又继续试尝百草。



尝遍了一个山头的花草,神农用木杆搭架,往…